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Displaying items by tag: Infertility

Wednesday, 21 July 2021 03:34

What are Some Treatment Options For Infertility?

In recent years, the number of couples seeking infertility treatment has dramatically increased and Dr Heylen president of the Southern African Society of Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecological Endoscopy (SASREG), this to factors such as women having children later on in life due to work and financial commitments, development of newer and more successful techniques for infertility treatment.

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Friday, 16 July 2021 12:00

When To Seek Advice About Infertility?

After a year of unprotected sex and you still struggle falling pregnant, it is advisable to seek help as couple. The doctor will conduct a physical examination of on the both of you to determine your general state of health and to evaluate physical disorders that may be causing infertility.

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Sunday, 11 July 2021 06:41

Factors That Contribute To Infertility

Age is a key factor: A woman’s age is one of the most important factors affecting whether she is able to conceive and give birth to a healthy child. Dr Heylen president of the Southern African Society of Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecological Endoscopy (SASREG), says up to 50% of all patients who visit a fertility centre are 35 years or older. She highlights that a man’s fertility appears to decline later in life than in a woman’s. If you and your partner do want children, but are not ready to take this step yet, it might be worth looking into fertility options and fertility preservation such as freezing your eggs, for when you are ready to start a family.

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Tuesday, 06 July 2021 11:15

What Is Infertility?

According to Dr Sulaiman Heylen, who is the president of the Southern African Society of Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecological Endoscopy (SASREG), not all couples who want a pregnancy will achieve one spontaneously and many will need to seek medical treatment to help resolve underlying fertility problems.

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Thursday, 01 July 2021 11:16

Who Is To Blame For Infertility?

In most cultures a woman is often blamed when she cannot conceive, overlooking that the man can also struggle with fertility issues. According to experts, 1 in 4 couples in developing countries struggle with infertility. Between 20 and 30 percent of infertility cases are explained by physiological causes in men and between 20 and 35 per cent by physiological causes in women. Between 25 and 40% of cases are due to a problem in both partners and unfortunately, in 10-20 per cent no cause is found. It’s therefore understandable why infertility has been recognised as a public health issue worldwide by the World Health Organization (WHO).

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Genetic mutations found in humans, fruit flies, roundworms, zebrafish, and mice may be linked to fertility issues and early menopause.

September 01, 2020 - A team from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified genetic mutations that may be associated with infertility and early menopause.
The study, published in the journal Science Advances, was initially conducted to find the genes involved with eye development in the early embryos of fruit flies.

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When you are dealing with infertility, you get used to the hurtful comments. Not that anyone is trying to be insensitive, but it’s the friend complaining about the decor at her baby shower or all of the cracks about how childless people have it so good because we get to sleep in. It’s always tough, but during the COVID-19 pandemic it has gotten tougher. People love to joke about the baby boom nine months from now — as if everyone stuck at home can just choose to get pregnant. The other day, a friend of mine posted a meme that shows parents lined up bumper-to-bumper to put their kids back in school when the lockdown is over. There’s another one that compares isolation for people with kids to isolation for people without them.

I don’t want to seem unsympathetic to what parents are dealing with right now: parenting full-time while trying to work and manage homeschooling. But trust me when I say that my husband and I are not at home gardening, doing couples yoga, and having sophisticated wine nights like the meme suggests. Like the thousands of Canadians who’ve had their IVF treatments postponed or canceled as a result of COVID-19 we are living in limbo, we are losing precious time, and we would kill to have your problems.

My fertility story is like a lot of other fertility stories. We had put off having kids for a few years —  I wanted to wait until we moved closer to my family, which we did in 2016. That same year, we stopped using protection. I knew the statistics about women over 35 getting pregnant (I was 36), but I wasn’t worried. We are both healthy and fit. My aunt had her kids at 36 and 41. I figured it would just happen. We had been “trying” for a few months when a close friend of mine got pregnant right away — and she’s older than I am! That hit hard. I started tracking my ovulation, buying those ridiculously expensive pee sticks. In April 2017, my family physician referred us to HART Fertility Clinic in Hamilton. I had no idea what lay ahead.

People hear IVF and think, you get a few needles, you get a baby. I guess there are some candidates who get lucky, but a lot of us struggle for years. Since that first visit to a specialist I have been through more tests and workups and assessments than I ever could have imagined. The hormones, the bloating, the injections, the probing. Between the blood samples and the intervaginal ultrasounds I have spent the last half decade getting poked. At one point my entire arm was a giant bruise. We started with four rounds of IUI (interuterine insemination, where sperm is injected into your uterus). When that didn’t work, we moved onto IVF, which is a lot more invasive (surgery to extract eggs from the body so that they can be fertilized in a lab and then re-implanted) — and more expensive.

Ontario is one of the few provinces that covers one round for women under 43, but the wait can be over two years. We wanted to get started, so we paid for the first round ourselves. And the second one. Both well over $15,000 when you include surgery and medication. After the second round, I did a pregnancy test at home and it came up positive. It was Christmas morning — I know — like something out of a Hallmark movie. We were so excited. We called our parents. Over FaceTime, I showed my sister the stick I had peed on. Six weeks later, we had a routine check-up. We saw the heartbeat, everything was coming along great. The same day, I started cramping and bleeding and eventually miscarried. To go from being so excited to so devastated in one afternoon — I wouldn’t wish that experience on my worst enemy.

Last year we finally came up for government funding, so we did a third round, which was a total bust. After we decided to start with a new doctor who was supposed to be a miracle worker. We ended up with one viable embryo. That’s not great in terms of numbers (in our first two rounds we had more), but the doctor told us that it was a really high quality, meaning the chances of a successful pregnancy were good. That was late January. You have to wait a full menstrual cycle before implantation, so that’s what I was doing when COVID-19 became an issue.

My implantation was just a few days away when I got the call telling me that it was canceled, one of the elective surgeries put on the back burner during the pandemic. I was expecting it, but it was still like, Are you kidding me? A major pandemic hasn’t happened since the Spanish Flu and now it comes five days before my implantation. Part of me is so frustrated that we couldn’t have been just a couple of weeks earlier or COVID-19 couldn’t have been a couple of weeks later. In some ways it would be amazing to be pregnant right now — to have a purpose while we’re all stuck at home. The other part of me feels lucky that we aren’t in the early stages of a pregnancy, having to go to the hospital and grappling with the uncertainty of any effects COVID-19 could have on pregnant women and their babies.

Our embryo can last 100 years, so that part isn’t a problem. But that doesn’t mean time isn’t important. If this implantation doesn’t work, my age will impact our chances for the next time. I turned 40 in isolation. I know it’s just a number, but it’s a milestone. I don’t think I ever would have imagined being 40 and not having kids.

It’s looking like clinics will reopen in mid-May, so we’re hoping that happens and we can move forward. Waiting and uncertainty is a big part of what makes infertility so hard, so just knowing that there is an end in sight is encouraging. Until then, I’ve been doing my best to stay positive, stay connected. Infertility is an isolating experience: Most of the people in my life have families and it can feel really lonely not to be part of “the club” as I call it. I am obsessed with my nieces and nephews. We’ve been FaceTiming a lot these days and it’s great. But seeing everyone at home with their families… it’s not easy. I’m mostly okay — I feel like I cried so much last year that I’m kind of passed that point — but it will creep up every now and then. On some days I’m able to be calm and think about things in really clinical, practical terms. And other days it’s like, MY BABY IS FROZEN IN A LAB AND THERE’S NOTHING I CAN DO!

My husband, Chris, has been amazing. Of course he deals with his own disappointments, but he is always pointing out the bright side. There are people who had to stop their IVF treatment before their eggs were harvested, so that means all of those hormones and money for nothing. At least we have something to be hopeful about. We have our embryo.

Mother’s Day is this weekend and of course that’s a little emotional, but I’ll get through it. Maybe by this time next year we’ll finally be parents. I have this strong feeling that it’s a girl. This is going to sound crazy, but the other day I bought a book and I put it in the room that will be, that we hope will be, the baby’s room. It’s called I Love You To The Moon And Back. It's kinda perfect for us; Chris and I joke that we have already been to the moon and back trying to become parents.

More information about traditional vs gestational surrogacy on our site.

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It is great when people in the spotlight speak out about their infertility. Although it is still spoken of too little and I believe too late – only after success. I think this gives the impression that you are somehow still “less than” if you are unable to overcome infertility.

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Wednesday, 21 October 2020 05:41

Gender Bias with Infertility

Even on Facebook, fertility is highly gendered. Participation in women’s support groups can number in the tens of thousands while men’s groups have less than 1,700.

In the absence of a health care model that draws men in, forums and online resources are a key source of solace and information.

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Katie Lee Is ‘Still Trying’ to Get Pregnant Amid Infertility Struggles

Katie Lee and her husband, Ryan Biegel, are not giving up on their family plans despite their infertility battle.

“We’re still trying,” the Food Network star, 38, told Us Weekly exclusively at the NYC Wine and Food Festival’s Aperitivo presented by Fratelli Beretta, hosted by Lee and sponsored by Liquor.com, on Friday, October 11. “We’ll see what happens.”

The Endless Summer Cookbook author shared her advice for other women struggling to get pregnant, telling Us, “There are so many women who go through this and just kind of keep it to themselves. I’ve had so many of them reach out to me through social media and hearing other people’s stories and sharing your stories is a way for women to find comfort together. My heart just goes out to anybody who’s going through that.”

The West Virginia native first opened up about her infertility struggles in April. “When Ryan and I got married, our plan was to start a family right away,” she captioned an Instagram upload at the time. “I couldn’t wait to get pregnant! I naively thought it would be easy. I had to have surgery to correct a problem, got an infection, then I was so run down I got shingles. My doctor advised us to try IVF. We just finished the intense process only to get zero healthy embryos. Not only is IVF physically exhausting, the emotional toll is unparalleled. We were filled with hope and excitement only to be crushed.”

The Beach Bites With Katie Lee star added, “When people ask me when I’m getting pregnant, it hurts. It’s just a reminder that I’m not. When they say I look like I’ve gained weight, I have. I can’t exercise as much and the hormones have made me bloated. I know a family will happen for us, it is just going to be a different journey than we imagined. We will keep working towards it. Someday we will have our happy new beginning and I pray any of you experiencing the same will have yours too.”

From Us Weekly Article by  Riley Cardoza

Learn More About International Surrogacy In Ukraine:

Delivering Dreams helps couples throughout the world struggling with infertility have children. Located in NJ and Kyiv and Lviv, Ukraine, our amazing medical facilities and professionals, surrogates and donors are in Ukraine, because Ukrainian law protects the rights of parents and their children from inception at affordable costs and high success rates.

Unique to Delivering Dreams, we offer guaranteed not to exceed, all-inclusive pricing and contracts under US law to provide prospective parents legal and financial security.

1 in 6 couples are struggling with infertility. You are not alone. We want to be your path to parenthood.

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Under Ukrainian law, surrogacy is a legal affordable option for traditionally married couples to have children using their own embryos, or with either an egg or sperm donor. There must be a medical reason you can’t carry a child. You are also able to participate if you have had 4 unsuccessful IVF attempts.

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Under Ukrainian law, surrogacy is a legal affordable option for traditionally married couples to have children using their own embryos, or with either an egg or sperm donor. There must be a medical reason you can’t carry a child. You are also able to participate if you have had 4 unsuccessful IVF attempts.